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Factory Legislation 1802-1878

Year

Act or Investigation

Terms

1802

Health and Morals of Apprentices Act Covered textile mills and dealt with 'Poor Law' apprentices only.
Hours of work were limited to 12 per day. No night work
Employers were to provide education, decent clothing and accommodation.
JPs were to enforce the Act and appoint visitors.
For all textile factories employing over 20 persons, proper ventilation was to be provided and mills were to be whitewashed twice a year.

1818-
1819

Peel's Committee and House of Lords' Committee Investigated child labour

1819

Cotton Mills and Factories Act Covered cotton mills.
No children under 9 were to be employed.
Children 9-16 years were limited to 12 hours' work per day.
JPs were to enforce the Act.

1831

Factory Act No night work for persons under the age of 21

1833

First Report on the Employment of Children in Factories This was the basis for the 1833 Act

1833

Factory Act Covered textile factories, excluding lace making.
No children under 9 were to work in factories (silk mills exempted).
Children under 13 years were to work no more than 9 hours per day and 48 hours per week.
Under 18s were not to work nights.
4 paid Inspectors were appointed.
Two 8-hour shifts per day of children were to be allowed.

1844

Factory Act Covered textile factories.
Women and young persons (13-18) were to work no more than 12 hours per day.
Children under 13 were to work no more than 6½ hours per day.
No child under 8 was to be employed.

1847

Factory Act Ten Hour Act.
Covered textile factories.
Women and young persons were to work no more than 10 hours per day

1850

Factory Act Covered textile factories.
Women and young persons to work in factories only between the hours of 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. or 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Hours were raised from 10 to 10½ per day.

1853

Factory Act Covered textile factories
Children were only to work during the same hours as women and young persons

1860

Bleach and Dye Works Act This extended existing provisions to bleach and dye works.

1864

Factory Acts Extension Act This applied existing laws to six new industries

1862-
1866

Third Royal Commission on children's employment .

1867

Factory Acts Extension Act This applied existing laws to all factories employing over 50 persons.

1867

Workshops Regulation Act This extended laws to workshops employing fewer than 50 persons.
No child under 8 was to be employed in any workshop.

1878

Factory Act This brought all the previous Acts together - consolidation.
Now the Factory Code applied to all trades.
No child anywhere under the age of 10 was to be employed.
Compulsory education for children up to 10 years old.
10-14 year olds could only be employed for half days.
Women were to work no more than 56 hours per week

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